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Dr Philip Brook
Dr Philip Brook
MBBS, FRACS (Orth)

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Dr Jonathan Cabot
Dr Jonathan Cabot
MBBS, FRACS (Orth)

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A/Prof. Peter Cundy
A/Prof. Peter Cundy
MBBS, FRACS (Orth)

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Dr Meng Ling
Dr Meng Ling
BMBS, FRACS (Orth)

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Dr Matthew Liptak
Dr Matthew Liptak
BMBS, FRACS (Orth)

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Dr Daniel Mandziak
Dr Daniel Mandziak
MBBS, FRACS (Orth)

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Dr Andrew Mintz
Dr Andrew Mintz
MBBS, FRACS (Orth)

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Dr Mario Penta
Dr Mario Penta
MBBS, MS, FRACS, FAOA

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Dr Aman Sood
Dr Aman Sood
BMBS, FRACS

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Dr Peter Viiret
Dr Peter Viiret
M.B.B.S. (Adel), F.R.C.S.(C), F.R.A.C.S., F.A.Orth.A.

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Dr Brian Wallace
Dr Brian Wallace
MBBS, FRACS

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Dr Jason Ward
Dr Jason Ward
BMBS, FRACS

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Dr Darren Waters
Dr Darren Waters
MBBS, FRACS

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Dr Justin Webb
Dr Justin Webb
MBBS, FRACS (Orth)

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Hip

This information has been designed to give you a basic understanding of your hip conditions and surgeries and to give you some idea of what to expect during your hospitalisation. Please keep in mind that this is only a guideline and that each individual has different needs. You may progress at a different rate to that which is outlined.

Your Orthopaedics SA specialist will be happy to address any questions which might arise after reading this information.

Total Hip Replacement (THR)

Total Hip Replacement is the surgery performed to replace a damaged or worn hip joint. The hip is a ball and socket joint formed by the head of the thighbone (femur) and the socket of the pelvis (acetabulum).

A smooth and compressible substance known as articular cartilage coats the surface of these bones. Arthritis occurs when the articular cartilage wears away exposing the underlying bone. This causes roughening and distortion of the joint and results in painful and restricted movement. A limp will often develop and the leg may become wasted and shortened.

The new joint relieves pain, improves walking ability, decreases stiffness and in most cases restores leg length and may correct the limp.

Find out more about Total Hip Replacement (THR) with the following link.

Anterior Hip Replacement

Anterior hip replacement is one of three common approaches (anterior, lateral and posterior) used to place a total hip replacement. It involves approaching surgery from the front of the hip joint (as opposed to the side or back of the joint).

Find out more about Anterior Hip Replacement with the following link.

Normal Anatomy of the Hip joint

How does the Hip joint work?
Find out more in this web based movie.

Trochanteric Bursitis

Trochanteric bursitis or hip bursitis is a condition most often found in middle aged or elderly woman. It is however; not uncommon in athletes and football or soccer players where extended periods of running are required.

Bursae are found throughout the body, particularly in the shoulder, knee, ankle and hip joints. They are small sacs of fluid, which cushion and lubricate the areas between the bones, muscles and tendons of the joints. When these bursae or sacs become irritated or inflamed, more fluid accumulate in the bursa, and will result in bursitis. Inflammation of the trochanteric bursa is a common cause of hip pain.

Find out more about Trochanteric bursitis with the following link

Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is a relatively new surgical technique that can be effectively employed to treat a variety of hip conditions.

Find out more about Hip Arthroscopy with the following link

Femoro Acetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) is a condition resulting from abnormal pressure and friction between the ball and socket of the hip joint resulting in pain and progressive hip dysfunction. This when left untreated leads to the development of secondary osteoarthritis of the hip.

Hip Resurfacing

Hip Resurfacing or bone conserving procedure replaces the acetabulum (hip socket) and resurfaces the femoral head. This means the femoral head has some or very little bone removed and replaced with the metal component. This spares the femoral canal.

Revision Hip Replacement

This means that part or all of your previous hip replacement needs to be revised. This operation varies from a minor adjustment to a massive operation replacing significant amount of bone and hence is difficult to describe in full.

Find out more about Revision Hip Replacement with the following links.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.